Classroom Strategies Series from My Attention Coach: #2 Organizing the Student with ADHD

Welcome back to Classroom Strategies from My Attention Coach. This post focuses on organization strategies that teachers can use to help the student with ADHD succeed.

Customization

I love it when teachers work with students to teach them how to organize. I encourage you to recognize that some students with ADHD might benefit greatly from specific organization strategies, but they also might need some flexibility. Keep an open mind and help students develop the the right organization strategy for them. Parents can also give you some great ideas here.

Planning

To help your students learn how to plan effectively, step one is making sure that the students have a planner. I know many schools give students a planner by third grade. The next step is to teach them how to use the planner. Teachers can support the learning by signing the planner everyday and requiring parent signatures as well. In addition, teachers can assist their students with ADHD by telling them what they should write down. By sharing the key points that need to be included in the planner and giving students enough time to write. It may take a student with ADHD a little bit longer to write down the assignment. I talk to many students with ADHD that just do not have enough time to write down their assignment. They mean to and probably need reminders, but they often need the time to do it.

Tickler Files

The next strategy is something called a “tickler file” and I would love to get more feedback on this one. “Tickler files” are something that adults use to help us remember to pay the bills as an example, and I think there is a way that students can use “tickler files” to help them remember when they need to finish given assignments. If a high school student has a term paper to finish, he or she could set up a “tickler file” to remember when notecards, outlines, drafts and the final product are due.

What do you think? Is there a way this can work for your student with ADHD?

 

Laura Rolands is an ADHD Coach, the founder of My Attention Coach, and host of Practical ADHD Strategies.  She works with students, adults and families to find effective solutions to their ADHD challenges.  

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom.
A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom’s view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

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adhd and school, executive functioning, General ADHD, organization ·

About the author

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom. A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom's view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

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Classroom Strategies Series from My Attention Coach: #1 The Classroom

I want to thank Penny for the invitation to share some classroom strategies here at {a mom’s view of ADHD}. Our goal is to share practical strategies that teachers, social workers and school psychologists can easily implement with students that have ADHD. This post focuses on the classroom and placement within it.

Location

It honestly surprises me that this is even something that comes up anymore, but I have heard feedback that this strategy is sometimes not used. If a child is distracted or diagnosed with ADHD, I really encourage the teacher to make sure that the child is:

  1. placed away from students that they love to interact with and who are easily distracted by, and
  2. that they are seated close to the teacher.

If you have a student that has ADHD, I do not care if he is the tallest kid in the class, there is a large benefit that you are going to get if you place that student close to you and away from the distractions at the back of the room.

Walls

I also encourage teachers to think about what is distracting your students on the walls and on the desks. This is probably more of a concern that I would have in elementary schools, but I think it can apply for older students as well. When you look at your classroom, you may have every single wall full of information and I know it is all valuable information. I would suggest, however, having either a part of a wall or even a full wall that is really blank. The child with ADHD can allow their eyes to rest in that place if they need a break from so much of the busyness that can be going on in a typical classroom. I would say the same thing for desks as well. Again, especially thinking about the younger students.

Please share your feedback in the comments and stay tuned for the next post!

 

Laura Rolands is an ADHD Coach, the founder of My Attention Coach, and host of Practical ADHD Strategies.  She works with students, adults and families to find effective solutions to their ADHD challenges.  

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom.
A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom’s view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Flickr YouTube 

Related posts:

adhd and school ·

About the author

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom. A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom's view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

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The "ADHD Mommas" are not medical or mental health professionals, nor an ADHD coach. Any opinions shared here are just that, opinions. I, and the other "ADHD Mommas," are sharing our experiences with our own ADHD children. Please do not re-post or publish any content or photos without a link back to {a mom's view of ADHD}. Have the courtesy to give credit where credit is due. Copyright protected. All rights reserved.

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