My Awesome Kid comforts others

We call her the “Animal and Baby Whisperer”…she connects with animals
and babies that no one else can. She can be handed a crying baby and the
baby will feel comfort immediately. She has a true gift to feel the energy
of those around her, understand the pain or needs and offer them
compassion and care. They, in return, feel her energy. –Pam

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom.
A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom’s view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

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MY AWESOME KID ·

About the author

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom. A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom's view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

One Comment

  1. Giulia says:

    Almost my situation exatcly. Here’s what we did:We got the teachers involvement. We came up with very clear behavior expectations for our daughter (who is only 6). We made a traffic light poster and conditions for each light. It seems kids at this age take quite and interest in traffic lights as they become more aware of the world. Green being a good day. Yellow having strict consequences. Only 30min of TV time, and no treats. Red = absolute grounding to her room. The poster was large and put up on the wall of her bedroom. Each morning we asked her what kind of light day she was going to choose to have.Then we brought this system to the teacher and discussed what we were doing at home. there was a 4 week printout with a traffic light in each day. The teacher would color in the light at the end of the day. So both at home and at school, the people with authority around her knew what was up.It took a about 2 weeks. The main incident was the red day she had for hitting someone. The grounding opened her eyes.What was important was applying the consequences without yelling or getting view-ably upset. She knew the expectations, and they were discussed before hand. We equally praised green light days. And even rewarded her after 5 green days in a row. We went to one of those buffets where after eating dinner, I promised she could eat as many sweets she liked. (Really, how much could she eat.)We all won.During this time we actually discovered she has Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). It’s on the outer edge of autism and is commonly misdiagnosed as ADHD. We also involved the teacher in our discovery. Its hard to tell sometimes how much of the behavior is SPD or a 6yr old behaving like a 6yr old.We keep plenty of play dough, and have rice filled containers for her to reset herself when we see she is getting beyond herself. It only takes 5 minutes of touching and she resets.Hope that can help someone

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The "ADHD Mommas" are not medical or mental health professionals, nor an ADHD coach. Any opinions shared here are just that, opinions. I, and the other "ADHD Mommas," are sharing our experiences with our own ADHD children. Please do not re-post or publish any content or photos without a link back to {a mom's view of ADHD}. Have the courtesy to give credit where credit is due. Copyright protected. All rights reserved.

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