Signals your child might have ADHD and/or Learning Disorder(s)

We heard so many signals from teachers, friends and family that went unnoticed before my son, Luke, was diagnosed with ADHD in first grade three years ago. I wish almost every day that a teacher or the school staff had been more pointed that his behaviors were a sign of something more than being ill-prepared for school {or bad parenting, which was alleged on countless occasions}. I wish that I knew more about ADHD so that I may have realized they were signs of something more.

If you are hearing any of the following from your child’s teacher or athletic coach or family members or the like, please take the time to get a formal evaluation for your child:

  • He is not prepared for school yet.
  • You didn’t take him to preschool so he’s behind all his classmates.
  • He doesn’t understand the danger of scissors.
  • He can’t write his name but everyone else can.
  • He isn’t sitting still during carpet time.
  • He doesn’t respect personal space.
  • He isn’t staying with the group and on task.
  • His body movements are exaggerated and I’m afraid someone is going to get hurt.
  • He won’t do his work unless someone stands right over top of him.
  • He looses everything.
  • He chews on inappropriate objects like pencils.
  • He blurts out answers.
  • He can’t follow verbal instructions.
  • He can’t do more than one task at a time.
  • I have to tell him things over and over again.
  • He does things he knows are against the rules.
  • He feels bad after he has an outburst.
  • He refuses to do assignments sometimes, not just off task but refuses.
  • He is overly sensitive.
  • He gets too emotional.
  • He is a lot less mature than his peers.
  • He’s behind grade level in one or more subjects.
  • He doesn’t have (m)any friends.
There are so many more warning signs, these are just a few. For those of you with children with a diagnosis (or many), what were you hearing from others that were warning signs of ADHD and/or learning disabilities? Please share in the comments. Often people visit our site looking for answers to problems without yet being diagnosed — by sharing warning signs, we help them know they’re on the right track.

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom.
A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom’s view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

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Related posts:

adhd and school, NEWLY DIAGNOSED, Penny Williams ·

About the author

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom. A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom's view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

5 Comments

  1. Crystal says:

    In preschool I had a teacher as me to get him tested for learning disabilities, which really put me on the defensive. That is not something you want to hear! I basically thought he was just an active boy. He could do everything the preschool wanted him to do except he had a difficult time with scissors and handwriting (he’s 14 and he still does, even though he eventually had occupational therapy at school for several years).

    One of my worst school memories with him was In kindergarten. About 3 weeks after the beginning of school at dismissal time, when all the kids were outside and parents were walking up to retrieve their children, his teacher walked up to me and said “the phys ed teacher and I think he has ADHD have you thought about putting him on meds?”.

    I went to the car and cried. That teacher was awful and she said that in front of other parents and children.

    I took him out of that school but the complaints continued. Finally in first grade I realized I had a hard time with him, preschool did, kindergarten did, now 1st grade is giving the same complaints…something is not right. That is when we began seeking help.

    For me it was a huge defeat to admit something was wrong. I just wanted him to mature and prove everyone wrong.

    Reply
  2. Gatwinmom says:

    I won’t call it denial, I knew my son had issues but because he was doing his school work (even  though his skills were behind his peers) I could allow myself to not think about ADD/ADHD. I can across a wonderful article that just made sense and helped me get the right help for my son.
    http://learningsolutionsathome.com/index.php/deficits-disorders/attention-deficit-disorder-verses-auditory-processing-disorder-big-difference/ 

    Reply
  3. Susan Bruhn says:

    Oh my gosh! My niece had three from the above mentioned signs of ADHD. But I cant tell straight to her parents that she might be having an ADHD because my mom would say it is just normal to a child.

    Reply
  4. I suspect myself of having ADHD since i possess most of its symptoms. I haven’t been to a doctor of internal medicine for a prescription drug, therapy or counseling. What I did was I serached for natural cures for ADHD and found some sites that offers helpful information regarding ADHD and how to naturally cure it. What I did was I created a good daily routine, give myself a 15 minute exercise (brisk walking, jumping rope, etc), bedtime massage and I avoid or limit my intake of sugary foods and foods that has preservatives. These helps a lot but I sometimes I’m getting tired of this whole routine.

    Reply
  5. guest says:

     Check out the The First FDA-Cleared Objective Test for ADHD, Facebook page for more information on ADHD
    https://www.facebook.com/ObjectiveADHDTest

    Reply

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The "ADHD Mommas" are not medical or mental health professionals, nor an ADHD coach. Any opinions shared here are just that, opinions. I, and the other "ADHD Mommas," are sharing our experiences with our own ADHD children. Please do not re-post or publish any content or photos without a link back to {a mom's view of ADHD}. Have the courtesy to give credit where credit is due. Copyright protected. All rights reserved.

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