why we need labels

You must define a problem first if you hope to solve it. You can make a list of the characteristics of the problem and then address each in the hopes of finding a solution. In fact, that is the ideal way to brainstorm and achieve solutions that address the real root of a problem.

But a long list of issues isn’t always the most efficient and direct plan of attack. You can’t go into the school and give them a long list of problems and ask them for accommodations. Well, you can, but you won’t get very far. It’s hard enough to get many schools to agree to a 504 Plan and/or an IEP when you have a diagnosis, i.e., a label given by a professional.

There’s a general consensus that “labeling” a child is bad. That it somehow tarnishes their school record or their reputation or maybe even their self-esteem. I do see the merit in that argument and I agree with it. However, I think helping my child appropriately with his particular needs is more important than the potential negative backlash of labeling him. I’m okay with a label (or three) if it acquires the help he needs.

The labels… ADHD, ADD, SPD, ODD, OCD, LD, PDD, Autism, Asperger’s, etc… define, at least in general terms, what your child needs extra help with. It’s a starting point for a dialog on what your child needs to be successful.

Does it also invite assumptions of what your child can’t do from many? Sure. And that’s the time for our trusty sidekick, “so what!?” We can’t let what others may think define our course of action when it comes to raising our {misunderstood} children. We need to accept the label, use it when necessary, and then teach our children to show the world what they CAN do and how they go about doing it {differently}. Then they’ll be seen as themselves once again.

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom.
A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom’s view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

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About the author

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom. A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom's view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

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The "ADHD Mommas" are not medical or mental health professionals, nor an ADHD coach. Any opinions shared here are just that, opinions. I, and the other "ADHD Mommas," are sharing our experiences with our own ADHD children. Please do not re-post or publish any content or photos without a link back to {a mom's view of ADHD}. Have the courtesy to give credit where credit is due. Copyright protected. All rights reserved.

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