Effective Study Tips for Children with ADHD by Laura Rowlands, ADHD Coach

Clients and teachers often ask me for effective study tips that will help students with ADHD. The study tips included here will help students of all ages prepare for quizzes, tests and exams.

Make a Plan

When you have ADHD, making a plan can be the most difficult and important part of studying. Difficult because it may go against your nature of acting in the moment.  Important because it can make your studying less stressful and more effective.  Experiment with this concept. Next time you have a test, think about how long you should study. Break your studying into time chunks over several days if possible. Put the time into your calendar, planner, phone or somewhere else that you will see it.

Implement Your Plan

I can hear your protest now. “But Laura, I can make a beautiful plan, but I won’t implement it.” Once you have made your plan, it can feel a little overwhelming to implement it. Focus on the first time chunk. What day will you start your studying?  Where will you go to study? What is your reward when you finish? Do what it takes to implement your plan, even if it seems like a very small step. Getting started will help you gain momentum.

Read Your Notes

You are thinking, “of course I’ll read my notes”, but I mean for you to read them aloud. Especially if you are an auditory learner, this can help you study more effectively than if you try to read your notes silently. I have one client who has been reading multiplication facts aloud to himself for a couple weeks. Just one set of facts each evening (3×3, 3×4, 3×5 … 3×11), two times through. This client reports that this simple act of reading the facts aloud is already helping with his middle-school math class. Could this strategy help you to study vocabulary? math? other subjects?

Take Breaks

Taking breaks can seem to be counter intuitive to my clients.  Many would rather push through all of their work and hope that hyperfocus helps them study. By taking even a short break, you can give yourself a chance to rejuvenate and recharge to get ready for more studying. A brisk walk can help even more.
What are your favorite study tips for students with ADHD? What works for you? Share here and on http://MyAttentionCoach.com and help others learn from you!
Laura Rolands is the founder of LSR Coaching and Consulting, LLC and http://MyAttentionCoach.com. She is a coach whose passion is to support, lead and inspire independence and success for people who have either been diagnosed with ADD or ADHD or who are facing other attention-related challenges. Laura has been featured on Making a Living with Maggie Mistal on Sirius/XM radio, listed as one of  50 Special Ed Teachers and Experts Worth Following on Twitter and recognized as an ADHD expert by OrganizedWisdom.com. Connect with Laura on Twitterand Facebook.


COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom.
A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom’s view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

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adhd and school, behavior modification, headline, homework ·

About the author

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom. A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom's view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

2 Comments

  1. This really resonates with me. I am known in my circle as the 'idea person,' but I always have to find an 'execution person' to help put all my great ideas into action.

    When my son is trying to study a concept, I have him “teach” it to me. This keeps him interested and helps him stay focused because he loves being in a position of authority.

    Reply
  2. dmd says:

    I wish I could use a list like this with my son, but (a) he's not there yet and (b) I'm not always the one going over homework with him. I work FT and it's either my husband or aftercare working with him on homework. I wish so much I could be the one. As the one who best understands him (I think!), I think I'd better be able to help him if I didn't get home when homework was nearly done.

    dee

    Reply

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