weekly homework checklist for download

We have searched high and low over the last two school years for organizational tools to help Luke with school work and homework. Before 2nd grade last year, I created an entire custom planner for Luke (and I even offered them for sale). When I met with Luke’s teacher before the start of school that year though, she felt it would be too much to keep up with and we never used it. At the start of the second semester, we tried converting to a binder system. EVERYTHING except books was to go somewhere in the binder. No loose papers were allowed in his desk or backpack. Even his pencils had a place in the binder. But, without support in school to use it and use it properly, the binder started coming home stark empty within a couple weeks. {sigh}
As you know, this year I took the wait-and-see approach to school. And it worked great. His teacher, Mrs. N, has a fantastic homework checklist that I adore. It has everything for the entire week on one page, and it’s a checklist, and it’s interactive (teaching self-management). Brilliant!

Each child has a homework folder. It’s a regular pocket folder with the clasps in the middle for loose-leaf notebook paper. Luke added a SpongeBob motif on the front of his folder the first day Mrs. N handed them out. I’m all for personalization, even if it has to be SpongeBob, it creates more ownership. Secured in the clasps of the folder are about 10 pieces of notebook paper. Spelling homework is completed on these pages and they stay secured in the middle of the folder. When homework is turned in on Fridays, the entire folder is turned in so nothing is lost. The checklist resides in one of the pockets.
As you can see, the checklist is super useful (as well, for us it has the week’s spelling words and the five spelling activities to choose from, with a place to check them off, right on the back).
Each time Luke starts homework, I ask him to start with the checklist. He fills in the date and decides which activity he will complete first. Upon completion of each task, we pull out the checklist and check it off. If it was reading or another homework item like math, not on the list, he fills in the blanks and then checks it off.I have him do everything on the checklist himself, I don’t complete it for him. Well, except signing that he did his reading. He did try to complete that himself too and I had to put the kibosh on that.
It is working quite well. It doesn’t change the fact that he’d rather not do homework and it doesn’t help him with his writing capability, but it does bring order and control to a process that he often feels is completely out of his control. It has certainly improved homework time and has ensured we are prepared each afternoon with everything we need.

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom.
A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom’s view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

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adhd and school, behavior modification, classroom accommodations, General ADHD, homework, NEWLY DIAGNOSED, organization, Penny Williams ·

About the author

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom. A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom's view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

3 Comments

  1. This is a great tool, Penny. Javi's teacher uses a similar worksheet. I have asked that she send home two copies of the week's agenda (as they call it) on Monday because Javi will invariably remove and lose one or otherwise make it unusable. Having two copies ensures the system works.

    Reply
  2. @Kelly

    I am glad to hear other teachers are using something like this. It has made all the difference this year in keeping things together. Well, the math sheets don't seem to end up in the folder. I think she tells them to tear the sheets out of the workbook and then he stuffs them (usually missing half the page) wherever. They don't have math homework everyday so I'm never quite sure.

    Good tip on keeping a copy. So far, we've not lost one (knocking on wood).

    Reply
  3. dmd says:

    Penny, does she use this with all the kids or just Luke?

    Dylan's school uses agendas – each child is given one (3rd grade and up). It's good, but there's not a lot of room to write (especially with oversized messy handwriting). I'm trying to work w/ the teacher to make sure that Dylan has everything written down and – more importantly – all the necessary materials. He's pretty good with the subjects in his main class, but two subjects (Language and Reading) are from other teachers and for a while those subjects never seemed to come home. That has been improving, however…

    I'll say it every time I post a comment here. I LOVE LOVE LOVE your blog!

    Reply

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