A window into the future

Yesterday Luke showed me that he was going to be ok. Not intentionally, not knowingly, but he allowed me to see more of his strengths and also his progress. He showed me some of the possibilites for his future.

He built a 64-piece Star Wars vehicleLego kit from the instruction booklet, without help, start to finish in one sitting, exactly per the instructions. I hear you saying this isn’t nearly as monumental as I set it up to be, that maybe I was a bit overdramatic. But if you have a child with learning and/or attention disabilities, you understand how truly astonishing and relieving a seemingly small occurance like this can be.

Luke has a large bucket of Legos and he loves to build with them. However, as when he draws, he cannot create what he sees in his mind, even the simplest creation like a 3-D box of a house. He can build cars and “rovers” but they are very simplistic. He has tried other small lego kits like this one in the past, but his dad always had to build them for him when he became frustrated and gave up.

Here’s what I learned about Luke from this epic Lego event:

  • He can understand written instructions and follow them (he struggles following through on verbal nstructions)
  • He can finish a task (granted he was a captive audience riding in th cart at the grocery store, but it’s progress nonetheless)
  • His fine motor skills are improving (there were some incredibly small pieces)
  • He is capable beyond his age (the set was for age 8+, he is just three weeks into 6 yrs)

I just saw something come through that I have struggled to see up to this point. It is a relief, it is a comfort, it is encouraging and it renews my hope that one day he will not struggle with the tasks that are natural to his peers. One day he will not agonize over how his classmates can do thing he can’t.

What an uplifting day for our spirits!

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom.
A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom’s view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

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adhd and school, attention/focus, learning disabilities ·

About the author

COVER3D_400sq_bestsellAward-Winning Blogger. Freelance Writer. Author. Warrior Mom. A self-described “veteran” parent of a son with ADHD, Penny Williams is the author of the Amazon best-seller about her parenthood in the trenches, Boy Without Instructions: Surviving the Learning Curve of Parenting a Child with ADHD. She is also the creator of the award-winning website, {a mom's view of ADHD}, a frequent contributor on parenting a child with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications, and co-founder of the annual Happy Mama Conference & Retreat, a weekend away for moms of kids with neurobehavioral disorders. Look for her second book, What to Expect When You’re Not Expecting ADHD, in late 2014. Follow Penny at http://BoyWithoutInstructions.com.

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The "ADHD Mommas" are not medical or mental health professionals, nor an ADHD coach. Any opinions shared here are just that, opinions. I, and the other "ADHD Mommas," are sharing our experiences with our own ADHD children. Please do not re-post or publish any content or photos without a link back to {a mom's view of ADHD}. Have the courtesy to give credit where credit is due. Copyright protected. All rights reserved.

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